photograph John Doyle

Bio

The author’s voice is immediately convincing. It is intimate, melancholy and intriguing.

The Irish Writers Centre Novel Fair judges Anthony Glavin, Catherine Dunne and Anna Carey.

Lani O' Hanlon is an award winning poet, writer and movement artist. Author of Dancing the Rainbow Holistic Well-Being Through Movement and The Little Theatre (poetry chapbook) She has an MA in creative writing from Lancaster University, and her poetry is published in various journals including Poetry Ireland Review, Poetry, The Irish Times, Southward, The Stinging Fly, The Moth, Orbis, Abridged, Mslexia and in anthologies; including Bloodaxe's Staying Human, Vanguard’s 14. The Munster Literature Centre’s Pandemia and regularly broadcast on national radio RTE’s Sunday Miscellany. 

Selected for Poetry Ireland's Introductory series in 2020 Commendations and Prizes include The Hennessey New Irish Writing, William Allingham, The Irish Writer's Novel Fair, The Bridport Prize, Poetry on the Lake, FISH, Mslexia, DiBiase, Dromineer, Brewery Lane, Over the Edge, Hungry Hill's Poets meet Politics. And a poetry film with Director Fiona Aryan was shortlisted for O Bhéal International Poetry Film competition in 2018, the first Irish winner in 2019, shortlisted in 2021 and selected from two-thousand entries for ZEBRA film festival in Berlin.

She received a travel and training award in 2017 from the National Arts Council to complete a first novel set in Ireland and Greece and a bursary from the Arts Council for a new project in 2021 exploring the relationship between dance, voice and poetry. She has been consistently supported with bursaries, training and funding from Waterford City and County Arts Office and Artlinks.

Reviews 'A poet of grace, memory and theatre, Lani O'Hanlon has emerged as one of the most distinctive and talented new poets of the South East.' Thomas McCarthy

'Her work is both a cure for what ails us and a cure for language itself: like the best and the rarest of writers, she restores words to their full potency and power'. Grace Wells

The familiar is rehearsed again to conjure up the remembered past, and it is done not in a melancholic or super-nostalgic way, but more as how one might compose a photograph Fred Johnston, Poetry on the Lake